Call for 1950s Collections

1950s: Building the American Dream has been on exhibit for a whole year now! In case you have not seen the exhibit yet, visitors are encouraged to experience the 1950s through the eyes of a family living in central Ohio with a hands-on, walk through of their Lustron home. Visitors can explore the nooks and crannies, cupboards and drawers of the family’s real, full-size Lustron house, built right inside the Ohio History Center!

Lustron

From VFM 4107 AV

Many of the objects in the house have been deeply loved by visitors and now need replacing. We are asking for your help for this list of specific needs to engage visitors and help teach the public about the 1950s. We are looking for the following items from the 1950s:

- Clothing in good condition including:

- Women’s dresses, shoes (keds, loafers, etc), pedal pushers, and women’s foundation garments such as a bullet or circle-stitch bra and bullet pads.

-Men’s pants, swim trunks,  and shoes.

-Boy’s clothing and shoes.

-Paint by Number paintings

-Eyeglasses

-A sewing machine

-Canning supplies

- Bonnet hair dryer

-Toys

If you are interested in donating, please send your name, contact information, and pictures of the objects to collections@ohiohistory.org

Posted in collections | Leave a comment

Countdown to the Moon Landing Anniversary: 4 Weeks

The second object in the countdown to the 45th anniversary of the Moon Landing is part of the international moon landing collection.  This intricately woven Iranian rug (catalog number H 72960) depicts an astronaut on the moon with the planted U.S. flag and Apollo 11 mission patch.  The words “Man’s First Print on the Moon”H72960 are woven beneath the image.  The rug’s image is so amazingly detailed that both the astronaut’s footprints and the Eagle landing module can clearly be seen.

Neil Armstrong, Buzz Aldrin, Michael Collins, and their wives embarked on a worldwide Goodwill Tour, called the “Giant Leap” Tour, from September 29th to November 05th, 1969, on President Richard Nixon’s Air Force One.  During this whirlwind tour, they visited 24 international cities, including Tehran, Iran, from October 28th to 29th. This rug was presented to Neil Armstrong by Mohammad Reza Shah Pahlavi, Shahanshah (King of Kings) of Iran during this visit.  Mohammad Reza, a friend of the United States, was deposed a decade later by Ayatollah Khomeini and died in exile in Egypt in 1980.

Posted in collections | Leave a comment

This Just In: New Papers Added to Chronicling America!

The Ohio History Connection is pleased to announce that more historic Ohio newspapers have been added to Chronicling America, the Library of Congress’s free digital newspaper database.  Issues from the following newspapers are now online and keyword-searchable:

In addition to printing news of local, state, national and even global significance, these papers often included poems and serialized fiction.  These types of items were important for readers because newspapers were not only intended to keep them informed by including information on events, people and places, but to entertain them during a time when the radio, television and Internet were nonexistent and owning books was a luxury.

Excerpt from "The Seamstress", a poem written for the Plymouth Advertiser (November 5, 1853, Image 1, col. 1).

Excerpt from “The Seamstress”, a poem written for the Plymouth Advertiser (November 5, 1853, Image 1, col. 1).

Many 19th century Ohio newspapers included at least one poem in each issue, and they were often found on the front page.  They addressed topics ranging from the triumphs, trials and tedium of daily life to controversial political issues, such as the Fugitive Slave Law (“What Do I Think?”, Fremont Weekly Freeman, November 23, 1850 Page 1, col. 3).  Some poems were written by people as famous as Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (“The Union”, Freeman, January 5, 1850, Page 1, col. 2), some were reprinted from other newspapers and still others were composed by local residents.  The poem to the right was written by a woman named Annie, a resident of Plymouth, Ohio, specifically for her hometown newspaper, the Advertiser.

Advertisement for "Teresa", a serial published in the Democratic Northwest and Henry County News in 1894-1895.

Advertisement for “Teresa”, a serial published in the Democratic Northwest and Henry County News in 1894-1895.

Serialized fiction first appeared in British newspapers in the 1830s, but soon crossed the Atlantic and was included in American newspapers as well.  In the latter half of the 19th century, it was not uncommon to find works of serialized fiction, written by both domestic and foreign authors, published in larger newspapers.  The Democratic Northwest, later known as the Democratic Northwest and Henry County News, often included serials in the last pages of each issue.  In January 1890, for example, Major James Franklin Fitts started his serial titled “Tried for His Life; or Within the Shadow of the Scaffold”.  A few years later, starting on October 25, 1894 and concluding on January 10, 1895, the story of “Teresa” was published.  It was written by U.S. Army Captain C.A Curtis and was billed as “a soldier’s love story, written by a soldier.”

Take a peek around the newest papers on Chronicling America, and see what you can discover about what our ancestors found entertaining over one hundred years ago.  There are over 280,000 pages dating from 1836 to 1922 from all over the state to explore!  These titles (over 58 in all!) comprise only a small part of the over 7.8 million pages from all over the nation that are currently available on the Library of Congress website.
Chronicling America is brought to you by the National Digital Newspaper Program, a partnership between the National Endowment for the Humanities, Library of Congress and state projects to provide enhanced access to United States newspapers published between 1836 and 1922.  National Endowment for the Humanities awards support state projects to select and digitize historically significant titles that are aggregated and permanently maintained by the Library of Congress at Chronicling America. As part of the project, the Ohio History Connection contributed over 200,000 newspaper pages to the project between July 2008 and August 2012 and will contribute an additional 100,000 pages by the end of August 2014.  For more information about this project and resources for searching Chronicling America, please visit the National Digital Newspaper Program in Ohio Project Wiki or Ohio Digital Newspaper Program Website.

Jenni Salamon, Project Coordinator, NDNP-OH

Posted in collections, Digital Projects, Digitization, Newspapers | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

Countdown to the Moon Landing Anniversary: Five Weeks

Neil and his parents Stephen and Viola (at right) attend dedication of moon landing bust. Bust reads "Neil A. Armstrong, First Man on the Moon, Apollo XI". More than 80,000 supporters greeted Neil Armstrong upon his return to Wapakoneta, Ohio on September 6, 1969. Bob Hope served as marshal for the event, and guests included "Tonight Show" sidekick Ed McMahon, Governor James Rhodes, Mayor Donald Wittwer, and Dr. Albert Sabin, inventor of the polio vaccine.

Neil and his parents Stephen and Viola (at right) attend dedication of moon landing bust.  More than 80,000 supporters greeted Neil Armstrong upon his return to Wapakoneta, Ohio on September 6, 1969.

On July 20, 1969, Neil Armstrong – a Wapakoneta, Ohio native – became the first man to walk on the surface of the moon. With the 45th Anniversary of this historic moment fast approaching, each week an object from our collection related to the landing will be highlighted on the collections blog.

The first object (H 43632) is a moon hat made by Leona Campbell. She created this hat in Los Angeles, California, to wear in a ladies’ hat parade on August 20, 1969. Not only did Mrs. Campbell proudly make and H43642wear this hat in celebration of the moon landing, but she also won a first place ribbon in the competition. Her hat depicts Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin planting the U.S. flag on the surface of the moon next to the Eagle lunar module, while floating above the moon’s surface is the Columbia command module, with Michael Collins shown inside.

Check back next Tuesday to see the latest artifact commemorating the first moon landing.

Caitlin Smith, History Collections Intern

Posted in collections | Leave a comment

World Cup Madness!

Which team are you cheering for this year in the World Cup? The FIFA World Cup is one of the most watched sports events in the world; millions anticipate, watch, and cheer on their favorite teams during the month long tournament. Here at the Ohio History Connection, we are excited to see one of our neighbors, Waylon Francis of the Columbus Crew, play for Costa Rica in this year’s cup. To get into the cup spirit, we are highlighting a few soccer objects in our collection.

H 70874This is a grey, red and black-colored ribbon made of metal and cloth that shows an Italian flag and a German Nazi flag with two soccer players depicted (catalog number H 70874).

The “länderspiel” was a soccer match held between Italy and Germany in 1938 in Nuremberg, Germany, to prepare for the 1938 World Cup. Due to World War II and the long recovery afterwards, the 1938 World Cup was the last one played until 1950. It featured the smallest ever number of teams from outside the host continent to compete at a FIFA World Cup due to anger over France hosting the cup and Nazi Germany competing in it. Austria had originally qualified for the cup, but due to the annexation of the country by Germany, its players were absorbed by the German team, which lost early on. The ribbon was obtained by an Ohioan, a first lieutenant in the 42nd Infantry Division in Germany, during World War II who thought it would make an interesting souvenir to bring home.

This is a soccer ball made from synthetic leather, cotton, and butyl rubber consisting of H 93519an outer covering made of eighteen separate pieces in white, green and blue stitched together. Printed on the side of the ball is “Mitre / MLS / MAJOR LEAGUE SOCCER / OFFICIAL / REPLICA BALL ULTIMA” and it is signed by former members of the Columbus Crew (catalog number H 93519). It was presented to Governor Bob Taft in 1999.

In 1994, the Major League Soccer announced Columbus, Ohio would be one of the founding members of the new North American professional soccer league. The Crew played their first game on April 13, 1996 at Ohio Stadium. They continued to play at Ohio Stadium until 1999. According to the Columbus Crew, “On May 15, 1999, the Crew forever etched its place in American sports history by christening Columbus Crew Stadium, the country’s first major-league stadium built specifically for soccer. A standing-room only crowd of 24,741 looked on as the Crew defeated New England, 2-0, in what was hailed by then-Major League Soccer Commissioner Doug Logan as a “re-launching of the League.” The Crew is one of the most successful franchises in the Major League Soccer, winning the League’s cup in 2008.

Are you planning on watching any of the matches in the World Cup this year?

Emily Lang, History Curator

Sources:

Dauncey, Hugh, and Geoff Hare. France and the 1998 World Cup: The National Impact of a World Sporting Event. London: F. Cass, 1999.

Heinrich, Arthur. “The 1954 Soccer World Cup and the Federal Republic Of Germany’s Self-Discovery.” American Behavioral Scientist 46, no. 11 (2003): 1491-1505.

“History.” Columbus Crew. http://www.thecrew.com/media/history (accessed June 14, 2014).

Posted in collections | Leave a comment

What is the Gay Ohio History Initiative?

June is Pride Month!

Danny Spears, 1987 Mr. Gay Columbus, posing downtown by river.

Danny Spears, 1987 Mr. Gay Columbus, posing downtown by river.

Join curator Emily Lang for a talk on Saturday, June 14th featuring collections from the Gay Ohio History Initiative (GOHI) at 2 PM on the museum floor of the Ohio History Center.

What is GOHI?

The Gay Ohio History Initiative, which began in 2006, is a collaborative effort between the Ohio History Connection and Outlook Media. With generous support from the Legacy Fund of the Columbus Foundation this project is designed to preserve Ohio’s GLBT history by building up our collection with artifacts that tell the story of the GLBT community in Ohio and to educate K-12 teachers on the roles of GLBT people in history.

Why is this collection important?

From the GOHI collection, ACT UP Protesters at the Columbus Dispatch, protesting the perceived lack of AIDS coverage at the Dispatch. ACT UP is an AIDS advocacy organization. The signs read, "ACT UP" and "No AIDS Censorship."

From the GOHI collection, ACT UP Protesters at the Columbus Dispatch, protesting the perceived lack of AIDS coverage at the Dispatch. ACT UP is an AIDS advocacy organization. The signs read, “ACT UP” and “No AIDS Censorship.

GOHI works to preserve, archive, and curate the history and culture of the GLBT citizens of Ohio, to tell the truth about our lives, to create opportunities for understanding of both the past and what is hoped for in the future, and to share GLBT culture and history with all Ohioans.

What projects has GOHI established?

GOHI is a multi-part project designed to educate Ohioans and raise awareness about GLBT citizens and our place in the fabric of our state. Some of these projects GOHI has established include:

"Flaggots Ohio" is a color-guard and performing-arts organization that was founded in 2002 in Columbus, Ohio. They have performed at Gay Pride and arts events across the country. Matt Eisert of Columbus, Ohio, donated this flag on behalf of Flaggots Ohio in 2007. The Columbus Gay Men's Chorus carried the flag in the 1992 Gay Pride Parade and displayed the flag when performing at the 1996 Gala Chorus Convention in Tampa, Florida.

“Flaggots Ohio” is a color-guard and performing-arts organization that was founded in 2002 in Columbus, Ohio. They have performed at Gay Pride and arts events across the country. Matt Eisert of Columbus, Ohio, donated this flag on behalf of Flaggots Ohio in 2007. The Columbus Gay Men’s Chorus carried the flag in the 1992 Gay Pride Parade and displayed the flag when performing at the 1996 Gala Chorus Convention in Tampa, Florida.

Collections

GOHI has been working to establish an archive of GLBT- related collections is continuously adding items. You can use the GOHI Collection in the Archives at the Ohio History Connection. A selection of documents and artifacts from the collection are available online in the Ohio Memory digital library.

Historical Markers

We are seeking public input to identify the people, places, events and organizations important to the history of Ohio’s GLBT community so that our history across Ohio can be commemorated with permanent historical markers. Visit Remarkable Ohio, an online database of Ohio’s historical markers, to view the marker celebrating Natalie Clifford Barney in Dayton.

Informative Banners

Two sets of banners have been created to celebrate GLBT Ohioans and gay rights activism within the state and to educate both GLBT and straight Ohioans. These traveling banners can be seen at various festivals and events that GOHI attends. Pride of Ohio is a set of three banners that showcase eighteen GLBT Ohioans. These

Anti-gay vandalism, in unidentified home in Columbus, Ohio. Shelf contents swept to floor, bookcase pulled off wall.

Anti-gay vandalism, in unidentified home in Columbus, Ohio. Shelf contents swept to floor, bookcase pulled off wall.

banners illustrate the contributions, achievements, and accomplishments made by lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender Ohioans. A Brief History traces the emergence and evolution of GLBT pride parades in Akron, Cincinnati, Cleveland, Columbus, and Toledo. These banners provide a timeline as well as information about attendance and speakers. The banners also illustrate how these parades impacted and were impacted by local and national events.

Interested in donating to GOHI?

Contact the Ohio History Connection at collections@ohiohistory.org or call 614-297-2535.

Posted in collections, Curators Talks, Current News, Donate, Gay Ohio History Iniative, Ohio Memory, Programs | Tagged , , | 1 Comment

I Found it In the Archives Contest 2014

I FOUND IT IN THE ARCHIVES The Ohio History Connection is sponsoring the I Found It In the Archives essay and video contest to show how the items and information found in the nation’s archives touch peoples’ lives. We’re seeking entrants who have found something special in our collections – records, documents, photographs, recordings – a meaningful item or treasure. If it has meaning to you, it has meaning to us and is a wonderful basis for your entry.

Between June 1-30, 2014, we ask that you submit either:

• A 400-word essay describing your quest for information and explaining why finding it made a difference for you, along with a color photograph of you,

OR

• A video of no more than 2 minutes in which you describe your quest for information and explain why finding it made a difference for you.

Essays and videos of the finalists will be posted online for a public vote. The entry with the most votes will be declared the winner and receive a prize package that includes a one year annual family membership to Ohio History Connection; a voucher for a free genealogy workshop at the Ohio History Center in 2014/2015; and a behind the scenes tour of the Center’s archives storage area in Columbus.

Rules
You may submit only one entry. Submitting more than one entry will disqualify you. Essays and videos submitted in previous I Found It In the Archives contest years may not be resubmitted. Repeat entries of the same information discovery in subsequent years of the contest will not be considered.

This entry form (click here to download) must be submitted with your essay or video.

You may submit your entry by email to archivescontest@ohiohistory.org or by mailing it to our offices at the Ohio History Connection, ATTN: Lisa Long, 800 E. 17th Ave., Columbus, OH, 43211-2472.

You must not currently be employed or previously have been employed by the Ohio History Connection – whether as employee or contractor – or related to a member of the same household as an Ohio History Connection employee or contractor.

Your entry becomes the property of the Ohio History Connection. We reserve the right to post your essay and photograph or video online. Materials will not be returned.

Timeline

Entries Due: June 30, 2014

Finalists Notified: July 8, 2014, and their essays or videos posted online for public vote

Public Voting Ends: July 28, 2014

Winner Notified: August 1, 2014

The winner may be asked to compete in a statewide competition. The statewide winner will be hosted at the Society of Ohio Archivists Fall Conference in October 2014.

Entry Form

Read Submissions from our Previous Winners

2011: Linda Carew Ejzak

2012: Brian Fox

2013: Doug Tracy

Posted in collections, Current News, Programs, Research | Leave a comment