Countdown to the Moon Landing: 1 Week

The 45th Anniversary of the First Moon Landing is almost here! This week’s object is a Venezuelan commemorative stamp (H 72652.002). The stamp is still intact on the original paper. The stamp features the three American astronauts – Neil Armstrong, Buzz Aldrin, and Michael Collins – above the surface of the moon, which has the Lunar Landing ModuleH72652_002
Eagle on it as well as Armstrong and Aldrin. The stamp reads “Vuelo Apollo 11” (Flight Apollo 11) across the front, “aereo” (plane) above the stamp value, and “Venezuela” at the bottom. The paper depicts the Command Module Columbia orbiting the moon. “Republica de Venezuela” (Republic of Venezuela) is written across the top with the Venezuelan coat of arms printed in the lower left corner. The lower right corner provides the governmental department from which the stamp originated: “Ministerio de Hacienda/ Direccion de la Renta Interna” (Treasury/ Direction of the Internal Revenue).

Moon landing stamps were a popular way to commemorate the event the world over. Some of other moon landing stamps in the Ohio History Connection include stamps from Yemen and the United States. The Yemeni stamp set (H 72655) has six colored stamps, one of each astronaut by themselves and one of each man with his family. The United US Stamp ImageStates stamp (H 72553.001) shows Armstrong descending the Eagle’s ladder to take the first step on the moon. It is attached to paper with astronauts’ names and the event; it even features a section for those who bought the document to sign their names, stating that they “Witnessed Man’s First Step on the Surface of the Moon.” Two postmarks are also stamped on this commemorative sheet – one for the day of the moon landing and one for the day this sheet was first issued in 1969.

The Eagle landed on the surface of the moon on July 20, 1969. Take a moment to celebrate the 45th Anniversary on Sunday and check back here next week to see what the last moon landing object will be.

Caitlin Smith, History Collections Intern

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