Curators Working Together

Image of Fort Jefferson was redrawn by Elizabeth Menke from the original in the McHenry Papers, at Indiana Historical Society. Published by courtesy of the Society, in Fort Jefferson, by Frazer Ells Wilson, 1950 copyright.  An image of the original drawing appears in The Mapping of Ohio, by Thomas H. Smith, page 87.  OHS also has a copy of the image in SC 283.

Image of Fort Jefferson was redrawn by Elizabeth Menke from the original in the McHenry Papers, at Indiana Historical Society. Published by courtesy of the Society, in Fort Jefferson, by Frazer Ells Wilson, 1950 copyright. An image of the original drawing appears in The Mapping of Ohio, by Thomas H. Smith, page 87. OHS also has a copy of the image in SC 283.

At the Ohio History Connection our curatorial staff work in three disciplines, archaeology, history and natural history. We find, however, that there are not neat lines in between them and that we have a lot to learn by working together.

For a recent post on the Ohio History Connection Archaeology Blog, archaeology curator Brad Lepper and manuscripts curator John Haas collaborated to explain how the rediscovery of documentation related to the archaeological exploration of Fort Jefferson in 1930 has brought renewed and long overdue attention to this important episode in Ohio and American history.

French prisoner of war box, catalog number H -----.

French prisoner of war box, catalog number H 26197.

In what is likely our very first tri-disciplinary blog post, history curator Emily Lang, natural history curator David Dyer and archaeology assistant Juli Six collaborated to tell the story of a French prisoner of war box housed with the history collections. Easily it is one of the more unusual objects collected by the Ohio History Connection. With David, Juli and Emily’s combined detective skills we now not only know what this box is made of, but also why it was made and likely when.

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