Hot off the Presses from Cincinnati and Medina

New Papers Added to Chronicling America!

The Ohio Historical Society is pleased to announce that more historic Ohio newspapers have been added to Chronicling America, the Library of Congress’s free digital newspaper database.  Issues from the following newspapers are now online and keyword-searchable:

The Star, later known as the Cincinnati Daily Star, was established in 1872 and published every day but Sunday.  Politically, it was independent, focusing less on politics and more on the happenings of the greater Cincinnati area.  While readers could find national and international news, for the most part, the Star catered to the needs of the readers in the Cincinnati area and the neighboring cities in Kentucky across the Ohio River. With a large reader base, the Star was also a prime spot for “Wanted” and other advertisements for various business, manufacturing and agricultural interests.  The Star did not include many images, but instead relied on catchy, alliterative headlines to draw readers into an article.

This article reports on the cold weather that hit Cincinnati in January 1879.  Citizens of the city were subjected to frostbite, frozen pipes and fiercely cold wind with temperatures barely above zero.

This article reports on the cold weather that hit Cincinnati in January 1879. Citizens of the city were subjected to frostbite, frozen pipes and fiercely cold wind with temperatures barely above zero. (Cincinnati Daily Star, January 4, 1879, p. 1, col. 2)

By 1878, it was the most read newspaper in Cincinnati with 20,000 readers, but only two years later, in 1880, it was sold to its rival Times.  Together, the papers were known as the Cincinnati Times-Star until it merged with the Cincinnati Post in 1959.  For more information about these papers and to access their digital versions, click here for the Star and click here for the Cincinnati Daily Star.

The Medina Sentinel was the official Democratic organ of Medina County, serving the county from 1888 to 1961 when it was absorbed by the County Leader Post.  Published on a weekly basis, the paper included some state and national news, but most of its content featured local news from the city of Medina and neighboring communities, like Seville and Litchfield.  Local news items were often composed of agricultural, business, church and court news; classified advertisements; death notices; and “Personals,” which reported the comings and goings of the county’s residents. The paper also printed serialized literature and, during World War I, war bond advertisements, like the one pictured below.

In World War I, dramatic advertisements imploring citizens at home to support the troops fighting in Europe through the purchase of Liberty Bonds were common.  This one goes on to say, “Yet when you refuse to buy all the Liberty Bonds that you possibly can...you are refusing to do your share” in protecting soldiers “against the brutal enemy.”

In World War I, dramatic advertisements imploring citizens at home to support the troops fighting in Europe through the purchase of Liberty Bonds were common. This one goes on to say, “Yet when you refuse to buy all the Liberty Bonds that you possibly can…you are refusing to do your share” in protecting soldiers “against the brutal enemy.” (Medina Sentinel, October 11, 1918, p. 3)

In support of its political orientation, readers of the Medina Sentinel were also encouraged to support Democratic policies and to vote for Democratic candidates in local, state, or national elections. Prior to elections, candidate profiles, editorials, advertisements, and political cartoons were prominently featured.  Click here for more information about the Medina Sentinel and to access its digital version.

While you are visiting Chronicling America, take some time to see what other news you can find in Ohio’s historic newspapers—there are just over 275,000 pages dating from 1836 to 1922 from all over the state to explore!  These titles (over 55 in all!) comprise only a small part of the over 7.6 million pages from all over the nation that are currently available on the Library of Congress website.

Chronicling America is brought to you by the National Digital Newspaper Program, a partnership between the National Endowment for the Humanities, the Library of Congress and state projects to provide enhanced access to United States newspapers published between 1836 and 1922.  National Endowment for the Humanities awards support state projects to select and digitize historically significant titles that are aggregated and permanently maintained by the Library of Congress at Chronicling America. As part of the project, the Ohio Historical Society contributed over 200,000 newspaper pages to the project between July 2008 and August 2012 and will contribute an additional 100,000 pages by the end of August 2014.  For more information about this project and resources for searching Chronicling America, please visit the National Digital Newspaper Program in Ohio Project Wiki or Ohio Digital Newspaper Program Website.

Jenni Salamon, Project Coordinator, NDNP-OH

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