Civil War Artifacts Going on the Road

The Ohio Historical Society has developed an exciting program for historical and community organizations and libraries. Designed to enhance your Civil War programs, events and exhibits, our new program allows you to “rent” a collection of Civil War artifacts. In addition, one of our curators will attend your event to share the history behind each artifact and answer questions. These collections can be delivered to organization across Ohio.

The following options are available:

Ohio Generals and Presidents
Ohio sent over 300,000 troops to fight for the Union including many well-known generals. After the war, five of these Ohio generals were elected president of the United States.  Audiences will be eager to see Ulysses S. Grant’s document box, a collection of Emerson Opdycke’s buttons from many of his uniforms during the war, shoulder straps from two uniforms worn by William Tecumseh Sherman as well as silk ribbon marking his death in 1891, and William McKinley’s presidential campaign buttons and ribbons.

William Tecumseh Sherman (1820-1891) was born in Lancaster, Ohio and is often remembered as leading “Sherman’s March to the Sea”. Emerson Opdycke (1830-1884) was a native of Trumbull County, Ohio and his unit, the 125th Ohio Volunteer Infantry, was well known for their courage and tenacity, earning the name “Opdycke’s Tigers”. Ulysses Simpson Grant (1822-1885) was born in Point Pleasant, Ohio and was appointed to the position of supreme commander of all Union forces by President Lincoln and after the war he was appointed General of the Army. In 1868, the Republican Party selected Grant as its presidential candidate. He served two terms as President of the United States. William McKinley (1843-1901), the twenty-fifth president of the United States, was born in Niles, Ohio and served in the Union army. McKinley became president of the United States in 1897 and was re-elected to a second term in 1900.

Cost: $450

Details: Cost includes curator’s travel and mileage. A curator will bring the artifacts and stay for your event/program for up to 8 hours. This collection includes the following artifacts: Grant document box, ribbon marking Sherman’s death in 1891, two Sherman shoulder straps, Opdycke’s wooden ring with mother of pearl inlay, buttons from various uniforms worn by Opdycke, and McKinley’s campaign ribbons. A conserved and framed battle flag can be added to the collection for a fee of $250 per flag.

Ohio Battle Flags

10th Ohio Volunteer Cavalry Flag. From the collections of the Ohio Historical Society

Many efforts have been made to preserve Ohio’s large collection of Civil War battle flags. Now you can bring two of these flags carried by Ohio troops to your event. Your audience will learn about the blue silk regimental flag of the 10th Ohio Volunteer Cavalry and the national colors of the 88th Ohio Volunteer Infantry.

The 10th O.V.C. was organized at Camp Taylor in Cleveland, Ohio in October 1862. The regiment took part in major engagements such as Chickamauga, the Atlanta Campaign and Sherman’s March to the Sea. The regiment was mustered out in Lexington, North Carolina on July 24, 1865. The 88th

88th Ohio Volunteer Infantry Flag. From the collections of the Ohio Historical Society.

O.V.I. was organized in Camp Chase in Columbus, Ohio, and mustered into service on October 27, 1862. The regiment served most of its time at Camp Chase and was mustered out on July 3, 1865.

Cost: $650

Details: Cost includes curator’s travel and mileage. A curator will deliver the artifacts and stay for your event/program for up to 8 hours. This collection includes the following artifacts: conserved and framed Regimental Colors of the 10th Ohio Volunteer Cavalry and a framed guidon of the National Colors, 88th Ohio Volunteer Infantry. Additional flags can be added to the collection for a fee of $250 per flag.

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One Response to Civil War Artifacts Going on the Road

  1. Mary says:

    Enjoyed the article and historical information.

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